Current Students


Music Education Performance/Pedagogy Music Theory Music History/Lit.
MUED 3140—Principles Of Teaching Music MUS 1230—Diction: English and Italian MUS 1000– Introduction to Music Theory MUS 2030—Music History/Lit. I
MUED 3510—Field Experience for Mus. Ed. MUS 1850—Woodwind Methods II MUS 1150—Music Theory I MUS 3030—Music History III
MUED 4010—Secondary Methods (Vocal) MUS 1860—Brass Methods I MUS 1151—AuralSkills I MUS 3500–Music for Stage and Screen
MUED 4010—Secondary Methods (Instrumental) MUS 1890—Percussion Methods I MUS 1800—Piano I MUS 4150/5370—American Music
MUS 4150A—Piano Pedagogy I MUS 1820—Piano III
MUS 2150—Music Theory III
MUS 2151—Aural Skills III
MUS 4010—Form and Analysis
MUS 5020–Form and Analysis (Graduate)
Music Education Performance/Pedagogy Music Theory Music History/Lit.
MUED 2020—Foundations Of Music Education MUS 1210—Diction: French MUS 1150—Music Theory I MUS 2040—Music History/Lit. II
MUED 3510—Field Experience for Mus. Ed. MUS 1840—Woodwind Methods I MUS 1151—Aural Skills I MUS 3040—Music History/Lit. IV
MUED 4010—Secondary Methods (Instrumental) MUS 1870—Brass Methods II MUS 1160—Music Theory II MUS 4060—20th Century
MUED 4110—Elementary Music Methods MUS 1880—String Methods I MUS 1161—Aural Skills II
MUS 3100—Advanced Conducting (Choral) MUS 1800—Piano I
MUS 3110—Advanced Conducting (Instrumental) MUS 1810—Piano II
MUS 4260Piano Pedagogy II MUS 1830—Piano IV
MUS 2160—Music Theory IV
MUS 2161—Aural Skills IV
MUED 5030—Theory Pedagogy (Graduate)
Music Education Performance/Pedagogy Music Theory Music History/Lit.
MUED 3510—Field Experience For Mus. Ed. MUS 1160—Music Theory II
MUS 1161—Aural Skills II
MUS 1810—Piano II
Music Education Performance/Pedagogy Music Theory Music History/Lit.
MUED 3140—Principles Of Teaching Music MUS 1230—Diction: English and Italian MUS 1000– Introduction to Music Theory MUS 2030—Music History/Lit. I
MUED 3510—Field Experience for Mus. Ed. MUS 1860—Brass Methods I MUS 1150—Music Theory I MUS 3030—Music History III
MUED 4010—Secondary Methods (Vocal) MUS 1890—Percussion Methods I MUS 1151—Aural Skills I
MUED 4010—Secondary Methods (Instrumental) MUS 1920—String Methods II MUS 1800—Piano I
MUED 4520—Choral Literature MUS 4390A—Performance Literature (Piano) MUS 1820—Piano III
MUS 2150—Music Theory III
MUS 2151—Aural Skills III
MUS 4010—Form and Analysis
MUS 5020–Form and Analysis (Graduate)
Music Education Performance/Pedagogy Music Theory Music History/Lit.
MUED 2020—Foundations Of Music Education MUS 1220—Diction: German MUS 1150—Music Theory I MUS 2040—Music History/Lit. II
MUED 3510—Field Experience for Mus. Ed. MUS 1840—Woodwind Methods I MUS 1151—Aural Skills I MUS 3040—Music History/Lit. IV
MUED 4010—Secondary Methods (Instrumental) MUS 1880—String Methods I MUS 1160—Music Theory II MUS 4060—20th Century
MUED 4110—Elementary Music Methods MUS 1930—Percussion Methods II MUS 1161—Aural Skills II
MUS 3100—Advanced Conducting (Choral) MUS 1800—Piano I
MUS 3110—Advanced Conducting (Instrumental) MUS 1810—Piano II
MUS 4150CVocal Pedagogy MUS 1830—Piano IV
MUS 2160—Music Theory IV
MUS 2161—Aural Skills IV
MUED 5530—Analysis of Modern Music (Graduate)
Music Education Performance/Pedagogy Music Theory Music History/Lit.
MUED 3510—Field Experience For Mus. Ed. MUS 1160—Music Theory II
MUS 1161—Aural Skills II
MUS 1810—Piano II
Music Education Performance/Pedagogy Music Theory Music History/Lit.
MUED 3140—Principles of Teaching Music MUS 1230—Diction: English and Italian MUS 1000—Introduction to Music Theory MUS 2030—Music History/Lit. I
MUED 3510—Field Experience for Mus. Ed. MUS 1850—Woodwind Methods II MUS 1150—Music Theory I MUS 3030—Music History/Lit. III
MUED 4010—Secondary Methods (Vocal) MUS 1860—Brass Methods I MUS 1151—Aural Skills I MUS 3500–Music for Stage and Screen
MUED 4010—Secondary Methods (Instrumental) MUS 1890—Percussion Methods I MUS 1800—Piano I
MUS 4150A–Pedagogy (Piano) MUS 1820—Piano III
MUS 2150–Music Theory III
MUS 2151—Aural Skills III
MUS 4010/5020—Form and Analysis
MUED Performance/Pedagogy Music Theory Music History/Lit.
MUED 2020—Foundations of Music Education MUS 1210—Diction: French MUS 1150—Music Theory I MUS 2040—Music History/Lit. II
MUED 3510—Field Experience for Mus. Ed. MUS 1840—Woodwind Methods I MUS 1151—Aural Skills I MUS 3040—Music History/Lit. IV
MUED 4010— Secondary Methods (Instrumental) MUS 1870—Brass Methods II MUS 1160—Music Theory II MUS 4060–20th Century
MUED 4110—Elementary Music Methods MUS 1880—String Methods I MUS 1161—Aural Skills II
MUS 3100—Advanced Conducting (Choral) MUS 1800—Piano I
MUS 3110—Advanced Conducting (Instr.) MUS 1810—Piano II
MUS 1830—Piano IV
MUS 2160—Music Theory IV
MUS 2161—Aural Skills IV
MUS 5030—Theory Pedagogy (Graduate)
Music Education Performance/Pedagogy Music Theory Music History/Lit.
MUS 3510—Field Experience for Mus. Ed.   MUS 1160—Music Theory II  
    MUS 1161—Aural Skills II  
    MUS 1810—Piano II
Music Education Performance/Pedagogy Music Theory Music History/Lit.
MUED 3140—PrinciplesOf Teaching Music MUS 1230—Diction: English and Italian MUS 1000– Introduction to Music Theory MUS 2030—Music History/Lit. I
MUED 3510—Field Experience for Mus. Ed. MUS 1860—Brass Methods I MUS 1150—Music Theory I MUS 3030—Music History III
MUED 4010—Secondary Methods (Vocal) MUS 1890–Percussion Methods I MUS 1151—Aural Skills I MUS 4130/5370–American Music
MUED 4010—Secondary Methods (Instrumental) MUS 1920–String Methods II MUS 1800—Piano I
 MUED 4520–Choral Lit MUS 4390A–Performance Literature (Piano) MUS 1820—Piano III
MUS 2150—Music Theory III
MUS 2151—Aural Skills III
MUS 4010—Form and Analysis
MUS 5020–Form and Analysis (Graduate)
The purpose of this handbook is to provide a wide variety of information to current students regarding scheduling, policies, procedures, etc. which they may need to know during the course of their enrollment. Look over the links that are listed which may provide the information for which you are searching.

Undergraduate Students
There are three categories of academic standing: good standing, academic probation and academic suspension (one semester or one year). Although students will usually receive official notification of academic standing, such notice is not a prerequisite to students being placed in one of the above categories. It is the responsibility of each student to ascertain academic status prior to the beginning of the next enrollment period. Professional departments or divisions within the university may set additional academic standards for progression in their programs. The word “semester” as applied in this policy, includes summer terms.

ACADEMIC PROBATION

  1. A student will be placed on academic probation whenever the cumulative grade point average is 10 or more quality points below a 2.0 average (A + 4.0); that is the total quality hours multiplied by two, exceeds quality points earned by 10 or more. (e.g. Student has 15 quality hours earns 21 quality points. Multiply 15 X 2 + 30; subtract 21 from 30 + 9; student is not on probation because 9 is less than 10). The definition of “quality hour” is any semester hour taken for which a grade of “A”, “B”, “C”, “D”, “F”, “I” or “Z” are assigned. (Grades of “I” and “Z” are treated as the same grade of “F” until resolved).
  2. Once placed on academic probation, a student will remain on probation (as long as each semester grade point average is at least 2.0) until a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher is achieved. While on probation, a student must earn at least a 2.0 semester grade point average to remain in school.
  3. Once a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher is achieved, a student will be placed on academic good standing.
  4. Transfer students are placed on academic probation until receipt of official transcripts from each college or university previously attended for determination of cumulative grade point average.

ACADEMIC SUSPENSION

  1. A student on academic probation will be suspended at the conclusion of any semester in which the student fails to earn a semester grade point average of 2.0. First time freshmen will not be suspended prior to two semesters of enrollment.
  2. A student who has been suspended for the first time will be suspended for a period of one semester. All subsequent periods for one full calendar year.
  3. A student suspended for the first time at the end of a summer term must remain out of school during the fall semester. A student suspended for the first time at the end of the fall semester must remain out of school during the spring semester. A student suspended for the first time at the end of the spring semester may apply to attend the summer term. If the application is approved and the student attends the summer term and increases the cumulative grade point average to 2.0 or higher, the student will be allowed to return in the fall semester. If the student does not raise the cumulative grade point average to 2.0 or higher during the summer term, the suspension for the fall is in effect.

RE-ADMISSION FROM SUSPENSION

  1. A student who has been scholastically suspended from the university may appeal to the Registrar for a waiver of suspension provided that student can document evidence of extenuating circumstances and provide justification for suspension waiver. Appeals may be granted or denied.
  2. A student suspended from Northwestern may not enroll in another university within the Board of Trustees system, but may enroll in a community college with approval of both the university and community college. Credits earned under these conditions will not be accepted for degree credit at this or any other system university. While a student is under suspension, no credits earned by the students at another institution may be used toward a degree at this university.
  3. A student who has completed a suspension period may re-apply for admission to the university. Applications for re-admission may be granted, delayed or denied.

WARNING!!
Northwestern State University will no longer cancel registration for non-attendance of classes and non-payment of fees. You must notify the Registrar’s Office IN WRITING to cancel your registration; otherwise, you will be financially obligated to pay all fees associated with your registration. Refer to the Academic Calendar and the Resignation Refund Policies listed in the Schedule of Classes Bulletin for specific dates.

ADVISING TIDBITS FOR ALL MAJORS:

  1. See your advisor early and often.  Your advisor will help you navigate when to take certain courses and will know when certain courses will be offered.
  2. Your private lessons teacher is considered your Major Professor.  Talk to them often about your degree plan.  He/she is probably the person on campus who is the most interested in your matriculation, sometimes even more than you are.  He/she can help tremendously, but only if you communicate.
  3. Music theory and history/literature are the most important music classes you will take.  Be sure to pass them as soon as you can.  These courses will help you interpret your solo literature as well as repertoire in band, orchestra, choir, and other ensembles.

FOR VOCAL EDUCATION MAJORS:

  1. Communicate regularly with Dr. Allen, Dr. Handel, and Dr. Joy.
  2. Piano classes/lessons are some of your most important classes.  The ability to play piano is vital when teaching junior high or high school choir, or elementary music. Be very diligent about developing your piano proficiency.
  3. Be aware of when diction classes are offered.  MUS 1230, English/Italian diction is offered every fall, but MUS 1220, German diction, and MUS 1210, French diction, are offered every other spring.
  4. Take the PRAXIS Exam as soon as possible after your freshman year.
  5. Be aware of when the following classes are offered as they only occur on alternate semesters: MUED 4520 (Choral Literature) and MUED 4040 (Choral Arranging).

FOR INSTRUMENTAL EDUCATION MAJORS:

  1. Communicate regularly with Dr. Handel and Dr. Joy.  Yes, even future orchestra directors.
  2. Take the PRAXIS Exam as soon as possible after your freshman year.
  3. Decide which area–percussion, brass, woodwinds, or strings–is your weakest. Be sure to take the first semester of that area before the second semester rotation comes up.

MUS 1000 Introduction to Music Theory   For beginning music students who need additional training and review prior to entering MUS 1050.  The Great Staff; notes and note values; key signatures; intervals, simple and compound meter; elementary sight singing, ear training and dictation; simple keyboard exercises; rudimentary musical terms; basic elements of form.

MUS 1010 Class Piano for Non-Music Majors Basic note reading; chords for harmonizing melodies and demonstrating techniques and methods in classroom music; for elementary education majors. Open to any student.

MUS 1040 Class Guitar for Non-Music Majors  Basic guitar skills and music reading; use of chords for harmonizing melodies and demonstrating techniques and methods for use in classroom music; for elementary education majors.  Open to any student.  Prerequisite:  2100 or consent of instructor.

MUS 1150 Music Theory I  Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.  Written skills will be developed in the areas of:  scales and key signatures, rhythm and meter, cadences, part-writing, harmonizing melodies and triads.  PLEASE NOTE:  Entering students will take a diagnostic test to assess their preparedness for Music Theory.  Test results will be used to advise students regarding their enrollment in MUS 1150 or MUS 1000.

MUS 1151 Aural Skills I   Prerequisite:  Concurrent enrollment in or credit for MUS 1150.  Sight-singing skills will be developed employing solfege, emphasizing diatonic melodies and scales.  Ear training skills concerning melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation, and chord qualities, will be developed.

MUS 1160 Music Theory II   Prerequisite:  Grade of “C” or better in MUS 1150.  Written skills will be developed in the areas of:  harmonic progression, non-harmonic tones, cadences, diatonic seventh chords, and secondary dominants.

MUS 1161  Aural Skills II   Prerequisite:  Concurrent enrollment in or credit for MUS 1160, and a grade of “C” or better in MUS 1151. Sight-singing skills will be continued with an emphasis on minor melodies, intervals, and chords.  Ear training skills will include melodic, rhythmic dictation, adding four-part harmonic dictation.

MUS 2150 Music Theory III    Prerequisite:  Grade of “C” or better in MUS 1160.  A study of music theory and score analysis, to include:  modulation, secondary leading tone chords, form, part-writing, transposition, borrowed chords, augmented sixth chords.

MUS 2151 Aural Skills  III  Prerequisite:  Concurrent enrollment in or credit for MUS 2150, and a grade of “C” or better in MUS 1151. Sight-singing in solfege, to include chromatics and modulations.  Dictation of four-part chorales.

MUS 2160  Music Theory IV  Prerequisite:  Grade of “C” or better in MUS 2150.  A study of music theory and score analysis, to include:  augmented sixth chords, color chords, 9th and 11th chords, delay of tonic, impressionist techniques, serialism.

MUS 2161 Aural Skills IV  Prerequisite:  Concurrent enrollment in or credit for MUS 2160, and a grade of “C” or better in MUS 2151.  Sight-singing in solfege, to include melodies with intricate rhythms and harmonies, atonal melodies.  Dictation of four-part chorales, and error detection and correction.

MUS 1210, 1220, 1230 Diction  French, German, and English/Italian Diction offered for vocal majors and minors.  Each language is a semester course.  MUS 1230 (English/Italian is offered every Fall. MUS 1210 and 1220 are offered in alternating spring semester.  Spring 2000 is MUS 1220 (German).

The following are performance ensembles for music majors, minors and students not majoring in music.  Music ensemble courses may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.
Ensembles for Wind and Percussion:

During the Fall Semester:  Marching Band (MUS 1310), Wind Ensemble (MUS 1310), Orchestra (MUS 1340), Jazz Ensemble (MUS 1360), Percussion Ensemble (MUS 1400), Woodwind Ensemble (MUS 1410), and Brass Ensemble (MUS 1390).

During the Spring Semester:  Wind Symphony (MUS 1310), Wind Ensemble (MUS 1310), Symphony Band(MUS 1310), Orchestra (MUS 1340), Percussion Ensemble (MUS 1400), Jazz Ensemble (MUS 1360), Woodwind Ensemble (MUS 1410), Brass Ensemble (MUS 1390).

Ensembles for Strings:

Orchestra (MUS 1340) and String Ensemble (MUS 1350) are offered during both the fall and the spring semesters.

Ensembles for Singers:
Chamber Choir (MUS 1330, by audition only), University Choir (MUS 1430), Women’s Chorus (MUS 1380), Men’s Chorus (MUS 1320), and Opera Theatre (MUS 1370).

MUS 1500 Recital and Concerts   Required attendance at recitals and concerts for all music majors.  This course is Pass/Fail only, and will not generate any credit hours or quality points.  Must be passed six semesters.  Lab Experience —  Lower level undergraduate students will meet every Tuesday throughout the semester.  On days that a Student Recital does not occur, the class will be split into two or three laboratory ensembles which will be conducted by student conductors who are enrolled on Choral Conducting, Instrumental Conducting, Advanced Conducting and Secondary Methods.  Instrumental students are to perform on secondary instruments or as vocalists.  Vocalists will perform as instrumentalists or vocalists.  Student conductors will be responsible for the rehearsal organization, preparation of the rehearsal space, choice of music, warm-ups and exercises and rehearsal.  The warm-ups and exercises should teach particular concepts and techniques that coincide with the chosen selection of literature.

MUS 1650 Keyboard Skills  Functional skills for piano majors, including transposition, harmonization, and score reading.

MUS 1800, 1810, 1820, 1830  Group instruction in piano for music majors and minors only with limited or no keyboard experience.  Consent of instructor or a grade of C or better in the preceding level.  This course provides instruction in functional keyboard skills including harmonization, transposition, score reading, improvisation, sight-reading, repertoire and basic keyboard technique.  MUS 1830 includes a series of four proficiency exams which serve as a culminating experience in the class piano curriculum.

MUS 1900 Guitar Class  Performance techniques; for majors and non-majors, not required for degree.

MUS 1910 Voice Class   Group instruction in voice.  Open to non-music majors.  May be repeated for credit.  Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.
Private Lessons  The individual curriculum for each degree program prescribes the level and number of hours credit for major and minor study.  Add to the section number of the course MUS 1700, 1710, or 3710 the letter representing the performance area from the following:

A – Piano            B – Organ                  C – Voice            D – Flute
E – Oboe            F – Clarinet                G – Bassoon        H – Saxophone
J – Trumpet        K – Trombone            L – Euphonium
M – Tuba            N – Percussion           P – Violin            Q – Viola
R – Cello            S – Double Bass          T – Harp             U – Harpsichord
V – Guitar          W-French horn          X -Conducting

MUS 1700 Minor Study  Private lessons for non-music majors.  This course is set up according to the individual student’s ability and instructor’s requirements.

MUS 1710 Major Study  Lower-level private lessons in major areas for the music major.  Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.  This course is set up according to the individual student’s ability and instructor’s requirements.  Bachelor of Music Education majors should enroll in 2 credit hours, and Bachelor of Music (performance) majors should enroll in 3 credit hours.

MUS 3710  Major Study   Prerequisite:  Successful completion of the Qualifying Jury.  Upper-level private lessons in major areas for the music major.  BME majors should enroll in 2 credit hours, and BM (performance) majors should enroll in 3 credit hours.

MUS 3720 Junior Recital  Approval pf performance faculty based on a recital preview jury is required for completion of the course.  Prerequisite: Junior standing in music, applied study, and consent of major professor.  Corequisite MUS 3710.

MUS 2030 Music History/Literature I  An examination of music history and literature in Western culture from the Greco-Roman era through the first hundred years of the Renaissance.  Emphasis will be placed on both academic knowledge and listening familiarity concerning important trends, composers, genres and individual pieces of music.  A $5 activity fee will be assessed of every student enrolled in this course, during regular tuition/fees payment.

MUS 2040 Music History/Literature II   An examination of music history and literature in Western culture from high Renaissance through the Baroque era.  Prerequisite:  Grade of “C” or better in MUS 2030 or consent of instructor.  Emphasis will be placed on both academic knowledge and listening familiarity concerning important trends, composers, genres and individual pieces of music.  A $5 activity fee will be assessed of every student enrolled in this course, during regular tuition/fees payment.  Prerequisite:  Grade of “C” or better in MUS 2030 or consent of instructor.

MUS 3030 Music History/Literature III   An examination of music history and literature in Western culture from the Enlightenment into the Romantic eras.  Emphasis will be placed on both academic knowledge and listening familiarity concerning important trends, composers, genres and individual pieces of music.  A $5 activity fee will be assessed of every student enrolled in this course, during regular tuition/fees payment.  Prerequisite:  Grade of “C” or better in MUS 2040 or consent of instructor.

MUS 3040  Music History/Literature IV   An examination of music history and literature in Western culture from the late Romantic era to the present day.  Emphasis will be placed on both academic knowledge and listening familiarity concerning important trends, composers, genres and individual pieces of music.  A $5 activity fee will be assessed of every student enrolled in this course, during regular tuition/fees payment.  Prerequisite:  Grade of “C” or better in MUS 3030 or consent of instructor.

MUS 3090 Techniques of Conducting   Basic elements of conducting relating to various media of performance.  Prerequisite:  2060 and 2080.

MUS 3100 Choral Conducting   Techniques of conducting choral groups.  Score analysis, interpretation and problems of presentation, rehearsal and performance.  Prerequisite:  3090.

MUS 3110 Instrumental Conducting  Techniques of conducting instrumental groups.  Score analysis, interpretation and problems of presentation, rehearsal and performance.  Prerequisite:  3090.

MUS 4010  Form and Analysis   Analysis of large and small forms illustrated in works of composers of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries.  Prerequisite:  2060.
MUS 4040 Choral Arranging  Secular and sacred choral literature form and harmonic structure; extension of individual creative ability by arranging of assigned melodies for different voicing; good choral sounds and effects’ voice problems and techniques.

MUS 4050 Instrumentation   Instruments in band and orchestra; score for band and orchestra; arranging music for band and orchestra, including assignments dealing with needs and limitations of public school organization.  Prerequisite:  2160 and 2040.

MUS 4060 Twentieth-Century Music   Music of major composers and schools of composition from Debussy to present.  Literature and analytical techniques.  Writing in contemporary idioms.  Prerequisite:  2060 and 20680.

MUS 4070 Composition I   Writing of songs and short choral and instrumental pieces.  Prerequisite:  2060.

MUS 4080  Composition II   Continuation of 4070.

MUS 4150 Pedagogy:
Subtitles:
01 – instrumental
02 – piano
03 – vocal

Materials and methods for teaching individuals and groups.  May be repeated for     up to six hours credit.   Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MUS 4200 Music Technology  Overview of harware and software, vocabulary and understanding music technology, MIDI, sequencing, digital sound sampling and editing, music notational software.  Prerequisite Music major or minor with junior classification.

MUS 4250  Instrument Maintenance and Repair   For instrumental music education majors.  Emergency and basic instrument repair, including soldering, re-padding, dent work, and adjustments.  Care and preventive maintenance of brass, woodwind, percussion instruments.  Prerequisite:  junior classification.

MUS 4260 Piano Pedagogy II  The second course in piano pedagogy sequence.  Prerequisite: MUS 4150 or consent of instructor.

MUS 4300  Piano Ensemble Literature   Music written for piano, two pianos and piano four hands.  Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MUS 4390  Performance Literature: Materials and repertoire of the major performance areas.  Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

Subtitles:

01 – instrumental
02 – piano
03 – vocal
04 – percussion

MUS 4400  Sound Recording   Theory and practice of audio recording, microphone selection and placement, mixing, equalization, compression, re-dubbing, mixing down.  Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MUS 4490 Piano Literature II  The second course in the Piano Literature sequence focusing on compositions from 1800 to the present.

MUS 4720 Recital   Preparation and performances in the major performance area of the public recital required in the program leading to the Bachelor of Music degree.  Prerequisite:  senior standing in performance and consent of the performance faculty.

MUSIC EDUCATION

Methods Classes for instrumental music education majors.  Performance and teaching techniques, and maintenance of instruments.  Woodwind I (MUS 1840), Brass I (MUS 1860), Percussion I (MUS 1890), andStrings I (MUS 1880) are required.  An additional second semester outside of major performing area is also required.  Students must choose this elective from:  Woodwind II (MUS 1850), Brass II (MUS 1870),Percussion II (MUS 1930) or Strings II (MUS 1920)

MUED 2020 Foundations of Music Education  Historical, social and philosophical foundations of music education and education.   Music ensemble organization and administration, opportunities, requirements and ethics in the teaching profession.  Observation and participation in schools.  This is a required course for all music education majors, vocal and instrumental.  This class provides an overview of the total public school music program.

MUED 2110 Instrumental Pedagogy for the Music Classroom   A survey of wind, percussion and string instruments designed to aid vocal educators in instrumental music instruction.  Emphasis will be placed on knowledge of the function of instruments and integrating them into vocal music programs.  Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

MUED 3140 Principles of Teaching Music   Theory, organization and practice of music teaching skills.  Techniques of planning, instruction, media, evaluation, rehearsal management and technology in music.  Prerequisites:  Admission to Teacher Candidacy;  Educational Psychology 3010.

MUED 3510 Field Experience for Music Educators  Practical application of teaching music, putting principle into practice.  Must be direct teaching experiences in music.  Includes a minimum of 30 hours of field experience.

MUED 4010 Methods for Teaching in Secondary Schools  Section 01n (instrumental) 02n (vocal)  Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for degree in teacher education, completion of MUED 3140 with a C or better, completion of at least one semester of MUS 3710 with a C or better.

MUED 4020  Current Issues and Problems in the Music Classroom Seminar  Prerequisite: Admission to teacher candidacy and co-enrollment in Student Teaching.

MUED 4110 Elementary Music Methods  Prerequisite: Admission to teacher candidacy, completion of MUED 3140 with a grade of C or better.

MUED 4220 Marching Band Techniques  Lecture and activities pertaining to drill writing, scoring for marching band, choosing literature, and rehearsing a marching band.

MUED 4230  Band Directors Workshop:
Subtitles:
01 – advanced marching band techniques
02 – rehearsal techniques
03 – instrument clinic
04 – instrument repair
05 – materials and literature

MUED 4460 Band Literature for Schools   Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MUED 4480 Orchestral Literature for Schools  Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MUED 4520 Choral Literature for Schools  Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

SACRED MUSIC

MUS 2120  Church Music: History I  A lecture/seminar course designed to introduce the student to the history of church music from biblical times to the present, including contemporary trends in church music.  The course is not structured toward or restricted to any particular denomination and will include the music of both Christian and Judaic traditions.  This course is designed for students interested in working in church music, as organists, organist-choirmasters, choir directors, ministers of music, and other aspects of music that incorporate worship.  No pre-requisite required; keyboard skills are helpful but not essential.

MUS 2130 Church Music: History II   Continuation of 2120.

MUS 3120 Church Music: Liturgics   A survey of liturgy and the formats of public
worship within the Judeo-Christian tradition.  The course will cover the development of
liturgy from the Hebrew temple and synagogue traditions to the present with emphasis on
contemporary worship styles.

MUS 3130 Church Music:  Hymnody   A lecture/seminar course designed to introduce the student to the history, development and basic styles of Christian hymns.  The course is not structured toward or restricted to any particular denomination.  This course is
designed for students interested in working in church music as organists, pianists, choir directors, organist-choirmasters, ministers of music, choir singers or any other aspect of church music.  Keyboard skills are helpful but not essential.

MUS 4120  Church Music: Administration   A practical exploration of the administrative aspects of directing a church music program.  The course is designed for students interested in church music and will provide guidelines for organizing and directing musical activities in churches.  The course is broadbased and is not restricted to any particular denomination.

For Graduates Only

MUS 5000  Seminar in Music Education   Philosophies and concepts in music education as criteria for curriculum development, supervision of instruction and administration of personnel.  Examination of current research in music education in teaching methods, psychology, and tests and measurements.

MUS 5010 Practical Review of Harmony/Musical Analysis/Music History and Literature   Review course material covered in:  1150, 1160, 2150, 2160, (harmony) and/or 2150, 2160, 4010 (analysis) and/or 2030, 2040, 3030, 3040 (literature).  Not for degree credit.

MUS 5020 Advanced Form and Analysis   Individual projects in analysis and class discussion of representative works on large forms from all periods.  Prerequisite:  4010 or equivalent.

MUS 5040 Instrumental Arranging   Practical band arranging; orchestration for average school situations with full instrumentations.

MUS 5060 Choral Arranging   Secular and sacred choral literature form and harmonic structure; extension of individual creative ability by arranging of assigned melodies for different voicing; good choral sounds and effects’ voice problems and techniques.

MUS 5070 Chamber Music  Performance of important works composed for small combinations of instruments and/or voices.  May be repeated for credit.  Credit may not apply toward any degree.

MUS 5200  Administration and Supervision of Instrumental Groups   Organization and administration of public school bands and orchestras; rehearsal methods and techniques; library systems; program planning and building, and substitution of instruments; plans and techniques of class instrument instruction; selecting, buying, and caring for school instruments; marching band programs.

MUS 5230  Advanced Conducting   Examination of scores with reference to rehearsal and interpretive problems.  Experience with instrumental and choral ensembles, both separately and in combination.  Repertoire appropriate to concert performance.

MUS 5270 Administration and Supervision of Vocal Music Groups   Choral ensemble; organization; rehearsal and vocal techniques.  Improvement of instruction; public relations; problems in scheduling, budget, and finance.

MUS 5280  Ensemble Performance  Problems of public performance from viewpoint of the conductor – director.  Practical experience with performing ensembles.  May be repeated for credit.  Credit may not apply toward any degree.

MUS 5300  Medieval and Renaissance Music   History of Western music to about 1500; representative compositions.

MUS 5310  Music in the Baroque Era    Development of homophonic and contrapuntal styles of the 17th and 18th centuries; beginning of opera, oratorio, chamber and orchestral music, and solo literature.

MUS 5320 Music in the Classical Period   Development of sonata form; emergence of modern orchestra and chamber music ensembles; representative works from literature of the period.

MUS 5330 Music in the Romantic Period    Western music of the 19th Century, including further development of sonata form, the symphony, opera, solo song, free forms, and program music.

MUS 5340 Studies in the History of Vocal Music   Vocal idioms of all stylistic periods.  Larger vocal forms of mass, cantata, oratorio, and opera.

MUS 5350 Studies in the History of Instrumental Music   Instrumental forms of all stylistic periods.  Larger instrumental forms of orchestral and wind ensembles.

MUS 5390 Performance Literature: Materials and repertoire of the major performance areas.  May be repeated for up to six hours.
Subtitles:    01 – Instrumental
02 – Piano
03 – Vocal

MUS 5400  Special Problems   Techniques and literature.  Scheduled by counsel and student’s advisor.

MUS 5490 Musical Instruments for the Elementary School    Instruction in the Orff instruments, ukulele and other instruments suitable for teaching in the elementary school.  Music reading and use of chords harmonizing approximately 150 songs.  Prerequisites:  2100 or equivalent and consent of instructor.

MUS 5550  Classroom Music   Music in the elementary classroom; philosophies, aims, concepts of music education; choosing and organizing teaching materials; development of skills in teaching music.

MUS 5600  General Music   Philosophies and methods of the general music class as propounded by leading authorities in the field; music literature arranged and compiled especially for the general music class.

MUS 5700 Minor Study **  Private lessons in minor areas, and for the non-music major.  Prerequisite:  consent of instructor

MUS 5710 Major Study**  Private lessons in major areas for the music major.  Prerequisite:  consent of instructor

MUS 5720 Graduate Recital    Preparation and performance of a public recital.  Required of performance majors, elective in other curricula.  Prerequisite:  consent of performance faculty based on a pre-recital jury.

MUS 5900  Introduction to Music Research   Research, bibliography, and source materials for each of the various areas of music.  Prerequisite:  graduate standing in music.

MUS 5970 Performance Document

MUS 5980 Thesis

**Private Lessons –  The individual curriculum for each degree program prescribes the level and number of hours credit for major and minor study.  Add to the section number of the course 5700 or 5710, the letter representing the performance area (see list for undergraduate private study).

For a minor in performance:

1150, 1151, 1160, 1161; plus four hours from MUS 2030, 2040, 3030, 3040; plus 12 hours in performance instruction (at least eight of these being in major performance area); and four hours of music electives (must include a music ensemble) – 26 semester hours.

For a minor in music theory:

1150, 1151, 1160, 1161, 2150, 2151, 2160, 2161, plus four hours from MUS 2030, 2040, 3030, 3040; plus six hours in major performance area and four hours of music electives (must include a music ensemble) – 26 semester hours.

Undergraduate students who receive grades they believe do not reflect the quality of their work may appeal these grades within 120 calendar days following the academic period in which the grades were earned. The procedure for appeal is as follows:

  1. The student should consult the instructor to see if an understanding can be reached. The student is entitled to an explanation as to how the grade was determined and to examine any tests, papers, or other information pertinent to the appeal.
  2. If the conference is not satisfactory, the students should secure a Grade Appeal Form from the University Registrar and Admissions Office or the office of the dean of the college in which the course was offered. The student may discuss the appeal informally with the dean if the student so desires.
  3. In filing a formal appeal, the student should complete the appeal form, stating the nature of the appeal, providing a detailed description of the justification, and requesting a specific action. Since the written appeal will be the basis for the ultimate decision, the student should ensure that it is clear, complete, and inclusive of all documentation the student wishes to have considered in the appeal process. It is the student’s responsibility to present written evidence that the instructor made an error or acted arbitrarily or capriciously in assigning the grade.
  4. The student should submit the completed appeal form to the instructor for review. If a solution is not found, the instructor should provide a written response to the student’s appeal, providing documentation as to how the grade was determined. The instructor’s response should include a copy of the course outline or syllabus provided to the student’s class at the beginning of the semester or term.
  5. After having met with the instructor and obtaining his or her written response to the appeal, the student may submit the form to the head of the academic department that owns the course. Following a review of the student’s appeal and the instructor’s response, the department head should provide his or her written opinion of the appeal, along with any additional pertinent information.
  6. If the student is unsatisfied with the opinion of the department head, he or she may submit the appeal to the academic dean of the college offering the course. If the student is unsatisfied with the opinion of the dean, he or she may submit the written appeal with all signatures to the Registrar. At that time, a meeting of the subcommittee on grade appeals for the Council on Admissions, Credits, and Graduation will be called to review and make a final decision on the appeal. The Registrar will notify the student of the decision.
PRAXIS: Professional Assessment for Beginning Teachers

NOTE: PPST Reading, Writing, and Mathematics tests (or NTE General Knowledge and Communication Skills tests) must be passed prior to applying for Admission to Teacher Candidacy.

PRAXIS Test Score equals= NTE Test Score _______________________________________________________________________

1. PPST Paper-Pencil tests:
PPST Reading and 172
PPST Writing 171 = Communication Skills 645
PPST Mathematics 170 = General Knowledge 644

or PPST Computer-Based tests:
Reading and 319
Writing 316 = Communication Skills 645
Mathematics 315 = General Knowledge 644

2. Professional test:
Principles of Learning
and Teaching K-6 161 = Professional Knowledge 645
or
Principles of Learning
and Teaching 7-12 161 = Professional Knowledge 645

I. Students may enroll in MUS 5720 (Graduate Recital), MUS 4720 (Senior Recital) or MUS 3720 (Junior Recital) for credit, or may give a non-credit recital. Students giving non-credit recitals must pay the $15 recital fee at the cashier’s office. This covers the cost of recording and programs.

II. Student recitals are given under the supervision of the student’s major professor. Students giving recitals must be enrolled in private lessons or an appropriate chamber music course.

III. Students may give recitals only on days in which classes are in session, or on a weekend between weeks in which classes are in session. No recitals can be given during final exam week.

IV. Graduate, senior, junior, and chamber recitals may be given pending recital hall availability, at the following times: 5:00 TR, 3:00 Sat/Sun, 5:00 Sat/Sun, 4:00 MWF, or 6:00 MWF.

V. Students wishing to give a recital must submit a request by the end of the fourth full week of classes in the semester the recital will be given. Or, if a student wishes to give a recital early in the next semester, he/she may submit the request any time within the previous semester. Students will give 3 dates/times of availability, in order of preference. Priority will be given to graduate degree recitals, then senior degree recitals, then non-degree (for credit) graduate or senior recitals, then junior recitals, and then non-credit recitals.

VI. Students giving a recital must arrange for a preview hearing. This includes solo and chamber recitals, and chamber groups that are comprised entirely of students. All pieces must be presented during the hearing, including chamber works. This recital preview hearing must take place at least 14 days prior to the recital date. A minimum of three faculty members, including the major professor, will attend the hearing, and will determine if the recital is prepared. If the panel determines that the recital is not prepared, the recital must be rescheduled. If the recital is not rescheduled before the end of the semester, a grade of “I” will appear as the official grade. Grades of “I” (Incomplete) become an “F” if not cleared within 60 days of the end of the semester.

VII. Degree recitals must be reviewed by three faculty members, with a grade given and forwarded to the appropriate applied faculty. If three faculty members are not available, then a recording can be given to an absent faculty member, who can then assign a grade based on the audio or video recording.

VIII. Students will be given a maximum of 3 hours of rehearsal time in Magale Recital Hall, including the dress rehearsal. These rehearsal times will be arranged through the Recital Coordinator.

IX. Programs must be submitted to the student’s major professor no later than 14 days prior to the recital. The major professor will proofread and forward to the departmental secretaries for copying no later than 10 days prior to the recital.

Download a .pdf file to assist you. Student Recital Checklist

BASIC PACKAGES:

1.CD Session– $100 Includes: 1 hour, equipment set-up
1 hour recording session
1 hour of editing
2 CD’s: Original and 1 copy

2. DVD Session–$150 Includes: 5 hours, equipment set-up
1 hour recording session
2 hours of editing
2 DVD’s: Original and 1 copy

Overtime charges during session: $50/hr.

Overtime charges for editing: $60/hr.

Extra copies of disks: $5 per disk

Cancellation fee: Session must be scheduled at least 7 days in advance. If session is cancelled less than 48 hrs. before agreed-upon session date:
$60 charge

Northwestern has several clubs, fraternities, and sororities affiliated with the Music School. These organizations usually have their own entrance requirements, dues, and obligations. All students are welcome to apply for membership in the organization that appeals to them.

Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia is a national professional music fraternity open to any male student interested in music of all types. This organization is a professional fraternity founded in 1898 at the New England Conservatory of Music. Its primary goals are to further the advancement of music and musicians with an emphasis in the American genre. Phi Mu Alpha sponsors recitals and usually assists the school with stage management, performance activities, recitals, receptions, etc. The faculty advisor for Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia is Mr. Jeff Mathews.

Sigma Alpha Iota is an international women’s fraternity which is open to members of the band, orchestra, choir, and also to pianists. This organization is also a service fraternity, and usually assists with receptions, hostess functions, recitals, and other activities. The faculty advisor for Sigma Alpha Iota is Mrs. Christine Allen and Mrs. Terrie Sanders.

Kappa Kappa Psi is a national fraternity for college band members and is open to all band students. The Theta Nu chapter promotes the welfare of the NSU bands through privilege of membership, campus leadership and various other venues. Theta Nu is primarily a service organization and assists the “SON” most visibly. The organization has been on campus since 1986 and takes an active role in the leadership and respectful social activities of the NSU band programs. The faculty advisor for Kappa Kappa Psi is Mr. Bill Brent.

Tau Beta Sigma is a national band sorority and operates primarily as a student service and leadership recognition society whose chief aim is to promote the existence and welfare of the marching band and other band programs. The goals of the Eta Pi chapter are not only to provide the band with organized and concentrated service activities, but also to give their membership vital and wholesome experiences in organization, leadership and social contacts. The faculty advisor for Tau Beta Sigma is Mr. Bill Brent.

Collegiate Music Educators National Conference is a club for music education majors who plan to teach in elementary, middle or high school. The MENC chapter is designed exclusively for music education students to provide opportunities for personal and professional development in the field of education. The chapter generally meets once a month to discuss trends in music education, listen to lectures or make contacts with leaders in the profession. It is open to vocalists, pianist and instrumentalists. The faculty advisor for Collegiate MENC is Ms. Kristine Coreil.

BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION (Instrumental, Vocal, Double)

If your last name begins with:

A – F: Dr. Greg Handel, Room:  224 S. CAPAC, Phone:  318-357-5777, Email:  handleg@nsula.edu

G – Z: Dr. Sharon Joy, Room:  206 S. CAPAC, Phone:  318-357-5754, Email:  joys@nsula.edu

All Vocal: Dr. Nicholaus B. Cummins, Room: 103 B, Phone: 318-357-5755, Email: cumminsn@nsula.edu

BACHELOR OF MUSIC  (Performance or Sacred Music)
Prof. Terrie Sanders, Room:  213 S.  CAPAC, Phone:  318-357-5762, Email:  sanderst@nsula.edu

BACHELOR OF MUSIC  (Music Business)
Dr. Kristine Coreil, Room:  312 S CAPAC, Phone: 318-357-5765, Email: coreilk@nsula.edu

MASTER OF MUSIC  (Performance or Music Education)
Dr. Dennette McDermott, Room:  324 S. CAPAC, Phone:  318-357-5761, Email:  mcdermottd@nsula.edu

TRANSFER STUDENTS
See the advisor in your major as all of these advisors deal with students who transfer into our programs.

Audition Forms
Bachelor of Music: Performance Concentration
Master of Music: Performance Concentration

Degree Checklists
*see Current Curriculum Guides (above)

PRIOR TO FALL 2011
* see Advisor

Jury Forms — 1 for each panel member
Jury Repertoire (download this and the jury comment sheet — print one on each side of 1 sheet of paper)
Jury Comment Sheet
Qualifying (3710) Jury Comment Sheet
Semester Jury Form Voice
Sophomore Qualifying Jury Voice

Music Education Teacher Candidacy Forms
Application for Teacher Candidacy
Recommendation for Teacher Candidacy Form

Recital Forms
MUS 1500 Student Recital Request
Recital Grade Sheet (1 for each panel member)
Recital Preview Sheet (1 for each panel member)
Recital Preview Form Voice
Student Recital Checklist